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Practice Name

North Shore Animal Hospital

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Primary Location
1 Neptune Boulevard
Lynn, MA 01902
Phone: 781-596-0510
Fax: 781-596-1439

Office Hours

DayMorningAfternoon
Monday8:00am7:00pm
Tuesday8:00am7:00pm
Wednesday8:00am7:00pm
Thursday8:00am7:00pm
Friday8:00am5:00pm
Saturday8:00am2:00pm
SundayClosedClosed
Main Content

Parasite Prevention

Cats and dogs are susceptible to a number of parasitic infections, several of which are zoonotic (possess the ability to infect people as well as animals). Parasite prevention is not only important for the health of your pet but also for the health of your family.

  

     Diseases Spread by Fleas

     Diseases Spread by Ticks 1

     Diseases Spread by Ticks 2

     Diseases Spread by Mosquitoes

Fleas and Ticks

Fleas and ticks are troublesome parasites of the skin. Flea and tick prevention is important because not only can they cause problems with the skin, but they possess the ability to transmit a number of diseases to the pet. Fortunately, there are many safe and highly effective products available at North Shore Animal Hospital that can treat and prevent flea and tick infestations. Regular use of one of these products can effectively prevent fleas and ticks from becoming a problem for your pet. It may be tempting to purchase an over the counter product for your pet’s protection, but be cautious since many of these products can have serious side effects if used improperly and may have limited effectiveness.

      Tick Myths 

      There is a Difference Between Cat and Dog Flea Products 

Intestinal Parasites

The most common intestinal parasites in dogs and cats include hookworms, roundworms, whipworms, tapeworms, giardia and coccidia. All of these organisms possess the ability to cause illness in your pet. Symptoms can include vomiting, diarrhea, weight loss and poor overall condition; although parasites can affect your animal’s health long before you notice any symptoms. Additionally, roundworms, hookworms and some tapeworms are zoonotic parasites, which mean that they can also infect humans. It is for these reasons that you should contact your veterinarian to check on setting up a routine testing schedule and monthly preventatives.  At North Shore Animal Hospital, we recommend internal parasite testing once or twice annually depending on life style.

Intestinal Parasites

The Companion Animal Parasite Council (CAPC) was developed in 2002 in order to provide guidelines for parasite control in cats and dogs. The panel is composed of experts in parasitology, veterinary medicine and from the CDC (Center for Disease Control). They have developed detailed information on parasite control in companion animals. For more information on CAPC go to www.petsandparasites.org. 

Screening for Intestinal Parasites

Most intestinal parasites are not overtly visible in feces. Your veterinarian is able to screen for infection by processing a small sample of your pet’s feces. We use an outside laboratory for reliable, comprehensive analysis. The Companion Animal Parasite Council (CAPC) recommends that a fecal analysis be performed 2-4 times during the first year of life for puppies and kittens and at least 1-2 times per year for adult animals.

Prevention and Treatment

The Companion Animal Parasite Council (CAPC) has developed detailed guidelines for parasite control and prevention in dogs and cats. The first step in intestinal parasite prevention is appropriate deworming of puppies and kittens early in life. Young animals acquire intestinal parasites from their mother while in her uterus or through her milk. Therefore, a large percentage of puppies and kittens are infected with intestinal parasites at the time they are adopted. Puppies and kittens should be dewormed every 2-3 weeks until they are 12 weeks old. Animals that are older should be dewormed at least twice when they are first adopted. Once initial deworming is completed, dogs and cats should be put on a monthly, year-round product that prevents intestinal parasites as well as heartworm infection.

      Parasite Prevalence Maps 

Environmental Controls

The yard or area where your pet eliminates can become contaminated with intestinal parasite eggs. This can lead to problems with reinfection of your pet or exposure and infection of future pets or humans. Immediate removal of feces from the yard greatly reduces the chance that the property will become contaminated with an intestinal parasite.

Heartworm

Heartworm is a worm that resides in the heart and lungs of infected dogs and cats. It is carried by mosquitoes that transmit heartworm larva into the bloodstream of the pet when they bite them. These larva then develop into adult worms that over time cause heart disease and respiratory problems in dogs. In cats, the signs can be more vague including vomiting, coughing, weight loss and sudden death. Fortunately this is a preventable disease and there are a number of excellent monthly heartworm preventatives available through your veterinarian. These products when given year-round provide outstanding protection against heartworm disease, and many also protect against several important intestinal parasites that can infect dogs, cats and people. There are even all in one products that prevent heartworm, intestinal worms, ticks and fleas. We can help you decide which product is best for you and your pet.

      The Cost of Prevention VS Treatment

      Visit the American Heartworm Society's Pet Owner's Resources

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Our Services

Services We strive to provide complete care for our patients. Learn more about all the services we provide. Make An Appointment We will do our best to accommodate your busy schedule. Schedule an appointment today! Online Forms Our patient forms are available online so they can be completed in the convenience of your own home or office.

Testimonial

Everybody is fantastic at North Shore Animal Hospital!!! My dog Yogi was neutered yesterday; The staff was very thorough and thoughtful!!! Love them!!

- Lori C.

Office Hours By Appointment

DayMorningAfternoon
Monday8:00am7:00pm
Tuesday8:00am7:00pm
Wednesday8:00am7:00pm
Thursday8:00am7:00pm
Friday8:00am5:00pm
Saturday8:00am2:00pm
SundayClosedClosed

Emergency Medical Services

During office hours call us immediately at 781-596-0510 and we'll ensure that your pet receives our medical care as quickly as is necessary.

Nearby clinics that provide after hours emergency care:

Massachusetts Veterinary Referral Hospital provides 24-hour emergency and critical care services for companion animals as well as for sick or injured wildlife. They are located at 20 Cabot Rd, Woburn, MA 01801.  Phone (781)932-5802

Angel Memorial Medical Center, Boston provides  24-hour emergency and critical care services for companion animals as well as for sick or injured wildlife. They are located at 350 South Huntington Ave, Boston MA .  Phone (617)522-7282

Meet the Team

DAVID A. DUNN DVM
Cornell University 1979
 
PETRA DOYLE DVM
Cornell University 2002
 
JEAN HIGGINSON DVM
Purdue University 2006
 
RACHEL BOSS DVM
Tufts University 2006
 
KYLYNN FONTAINE DVM
Tufts University 2014
 
JEFFREY EVANS DVM
St.George's University 2014
 
WENDY SMILLE DVM
University of California Davis 2016
 
KRISTI M. MAGIDA DVM
Ross University 2014

Contact

1 Neptune Boulevard
Lynn, MA 01902
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  • Phone: 781-596-0510
  • Fax: 781-596-1439
  • Email Us

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